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Weight Distribution hitches


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#31 cdsmith

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Posted 01 November 2008 - 07:47 PM

QUOTE (lonlawrence @ Oct 28 2008, 11:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The only problem with the single arm model is that it mounts right where a lot of Casita owners mount a generator. Also it's maxed out on its capacity with a 17' casita that's pretty well loaded and some guys have complained they couldn't get their vehicle level with it because of that. It's a little on the light side for a tongue that weighs 400-450 lbs.


The problem is: "that some guys" are trying to level an overloaded TV. If the TV is loaded and leveled before hitching up, as it shoud be, then a 400 pound rated single bar WDH should be capable of bringing the TV back within a degree or two of level.

Another problem is "that some guys" are overloading their TV when the hitch weight is added to the total load of their TV. You should never exceed the maximum passenger plus cargo weight of your TV including the hitch weight. This should be listed on or near the driver's door or door post (for 2004 and later models). Early model TV can use the later model maximum as a guide.

And the obligatory, IMHO

Joyce and Charlie Smith, Princess Lily, Rose, and Violet - Grand Prairie, TX
RV: 1999 SD "The Little Egg"
TV: 2007 Escalade 2WD 6.2L V8 - 6L80E Trans - 3.42 Diff
Brake Control: Dexter Predator DX-2

#32 lonlawrence

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Posted 16 November 2008 - 05:46 PM

I just added the Reese Pro Series WD hitch to my Casita. A lot of the owners have been using the Equal-i-zer hitch, but there were several reasons I wanted to try this one instead... price was one reason. Of course these two mentioned have a built-in sway control you should find interesting. If you want to see pictures of the installation and an explanation, go to my web page here:

http://web.me.com/dr...asita_Mods.html


#33 Harold Gill

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 02:07 PM

Towing my 17' SD with a 2008 GMC 1500 does not present a sway or load leveling problem, however I am still intrigued by the thought that better 'control' in adverse conditions would give a reason to consider a W. D. hitch as well as one that also controlled sway.

I know this has been a topic of discussion here, and several recommendations have been noted.
My question is, does anyone have experience to recommend the Hensley Arrow or the Hensley Cub
I understand that they are 'pricey'. When they won't quote the price after you spend the 25 min. to watch the video, You know it's gotta be high.
I am impressed by how it functions though, and that it is designed to deal safely with emergency maneuvers as well as load leveling.

Thanks, Harold
Harold & Carol Gill Mesa, AZ.
2006 Casita 17' SD HLA; 2008 GMC Sierra 1500

#34 laura

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Posted 23 March 2011 - 06:30 PM

Please help a newbie..we have a 2001 SD with the two propane tanks and a 2000 honda generator on the tonque weighing 46 lbs. Our pull vehicle is a Toyota Sequoia with a rating of up to 6500 lbs..we have a sway bar and are wondering..do you really need a weight distribution hitch also? We keep reading in the forum about people who are using them on their Casita's but didn't think we needed one. Please advise as we are going on our first trip soon. We have a weight distribution hitch but the brackets go right where the propane tanks are so their is no way to tighten the chains on the bars so were not planning on using it..please advise.



#35 laura

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Posted 23 March 2011 - 06:30 PM

Please help a newbie..we have a 2001 SD with the two propane tanks and a 2000 honda generator on the tonque weighing 46 lbs. Our pull vehicle is a Toyota Sequoia with a rating of up to 6500 lbs..we have a sway bar and are wondering..do you really need a weight distribution hitch also? We keep reading in the forum about people who are using them on their Casita's but didn't think we needed one. Please advise as we are going on our first trip soon. We have a weight distribution hitch but the brackets go right where the propane tanks are so their is no way to tighten the chains on the bars so were not planning on using it..please advise.



#36 SteveH

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 06:14 AM

Please help a newbie..we have a 2001 SD with the two propane tanks and a 2000 honda generator on the tonque weighing 46 lbs. Our pull vehicle is a Toyota Sequoia with a rating of up to 6500 lbs..we have a sway bar and are wondering..do you really need a weight distribution hitch also? We keep reading in the forum about people who are using them on their Casita's but didn't think we needed one. Please advise as we are going on our first trip soon. We have a weight distribution hitch but the brackets go right where the propane tanks are so their is no way to tighten the chains on the bars so were not planning on using it..please advise.


Laura, Your question is one that cannot be answered from afar. You need to do some testing, with first understanding the purpose of a weight distribution hitch. The WD hitch returns the weight to the front axle of the tow vehicle that has been removed by adding trailer tongue weight at the hitch, behind the rear axle. What happens is the vehicle becomes a lever with the rear axle being the fucrum, and with enough weight on the hitch, the front axle looses weight that is needed for steering and stopping traction.

Now, do this test....on level pavement, measure the height of the tow vehicle at the front fender directly above the front tire before attaching the trailer. Then attach the trailer to the tow vehicle, and measure the height again. If the height at the front fender is 1/4" or more, greater when the trailer is attached, you would definately be safer with a WD hitch.

In addition to safety while towing, a WD hitch will also improve the ride and handling. Can you "get by" without it? Probably. Will you be safer and more comfortable with it? Definately more comfortable, and if you get a 1/4" rise in the above test, definately safer.
Regards,
Steve

#37 Indy-hp

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 10:55 AM

Laura, Your question is one that cannot be answered from afar. You need to do some testing, with first understanding the purpose of a weight distribution hitch. The WD hitch returns the weight to the front axle of the tow vehicle that has been removed by adding trailer tongue weight at the hitch, behind the rear axle. What happens is the vehicle becomes a lever with the rear axle being the fucrum, and with enough weight on the hitch, the front axle looses weight that is needed for steering and stopping traction.

Now, do this test....on level pavement, measure the height of the tow vehicle at the front fender directly above the front tire before attaching the trailer. Then attach the trailer to the tow vehicle, and measure the height again. If the height at the front fender is 1/4" or more, greater when the trailer is attached, you would definately be safer with a WD hitch.

In addition to safety while towing, a WD hitch will also improve the ride and handling. Can you "get by" without it? Probably. Will you be safer and more comfortable with it? Definately more comfortable, and if you get a 1/4" rise in the above test, definately safer.

I agree with Steve. 1/4" or less body lift at the front tires when hitched and there is no need for a WDH.

Edited by Indy-hp, 24 March 2011 - 10:55 AM.

Henry & Debbie
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#38 SteveH

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 05:02 PM

Laura, Your question is one that cannot be answered from afar. You need to do some testing, with first understanding the purpose of a weight distribution hitch. The WD hitch returns the weight to the front axle of the tow vehicle that has been removed by adding trailer tongue weight at the hitch, behind the rear axle. What happens is the vehicle becomes a lever with the rear axle being the fucrum, and with enough weight on the hitch, the front axle looses weight that is needed for steering and stopping traction.

Now, do this test....on level pavement, measure the height of the tow vehicle at the front fender directly above the front tire before attaching the trailer. Then attach the trailer to the tow vehicle, and measure the height again. If the height at the front fender is 1/4" or more, greater when the trailer is attached, you would definately be safer with a WD hitch.

In addition to safety while towing, a WD hitch will also improve the ride and handling. Can you "get by" without it? Probably. Will you be safer and more comfortable with it? Definately more comfortable, and if you get a 1/4" rise in the above test, definately safer.

I agree with Steve. 1/4" or less body lift at the front tires when hitched and there is no need for a WDH.


Indy-hp,

I don't think we totally agree. I did not ever say there was "no need for a WDH". Any time you are towing a trailer with significant tongue weight for the tow vehicle, and even when the weight is not significant, there is still a justifiable "need", in my opinion.

I tow my 17' Casita with a crew cab, 3/4 ton, GMC Diesel 4X4 pickup, and I use a single bar weight distribution hitch because it is better than without it. The WDH takes all the ride problems away, what I call porposing, and therefore the handling is also improved. Is the rig unsafe without it? I think not. Is it improved? Definately, or I wouldn't use it.

The weight distribution hitch simply by means of leverage, moves the tongue weight off the hitch ball, which might be as much as five feet behind the rear axle, to on top of the rear axle, as far as the tow vehicle is concerned.

The movement of the weight to over the rear axle also restores the normal weight to the front axle of the TV, the primary brakeing and only stearing axle. It also improves the ride of the TV.

Of course, the more limited the tow capacity of the tow vehicle, the more important the weight distribution hitch becomes with a given tongue weight trailer.
Regards,
Steve

#39 Luckyman

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 06:14 AM

Laura, Your question is one that cannot be answered from afar. You need to do some testing, with first understanding the purpose of a weight distribution hitch. The WD hitch returns the weight to the front axle of the tow vehicle that has been removed by adding trailer tongue weight at the hitch, behind the rear axle. What happens is the vehicle becomes a lever with the rear axle being the fucrum, and with enough weight on the hitch, the front axle looses weight that is needed for steering and stopping traction.

Now, do this test....on level pavement, measure the height of the tow vehicle at the front fender directly above the front tire before attaching the trailer. Then attach the trailer to the tow vehicle, and measure the height again. If the height at the front fender is 1/4" or more, greater when the trailer is attached, you would definately be safer with a WD hitch.

In addition to safety while towing, a WD hitch will also improve the ride and handling. Can you "get by" without it? Probably. Will you be safer and more comfortable with it? Definately more comfortable, and if you get a 1/4" rise in the above test, definately safer.

I agree with Steve. 1/4" or less body lift at the front tires when hitched and there is no need for a WDH.



The weight distribution hitch simply by means of leverage, moves the tongue weight off the hitch ball, which might be as much as five feet behind the rear axle, to on top of the rear axle, as far as the tow vehicle is concerned.


Hitch up your trailer, drive to a set of scales, and place your tow vehicle's rear axle on the scales. Now, employ your wdh and unemploy your wdh. You will find that when you employ your wdh, your tow vehicle's rear axle weight will decrease, not increase. When the wdh is taken off, the tow vehicle's rear axle weight will increase. A wdh does not "moves the tongue weight off the hitch ball, which might be as much as five feet behind the rear axle, to on top of the rear axle, as far as the tow vehicle is concerned".

#40 SteveH

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 06:12 PM

Luckyman,

The reason I said "as far as the tow vehicle is concerned" is, there is a portion of the tongue weight that is actually applied back onto the trailer....roughly 1/3, but that is another portion of the equasion all together.

The fact remains, and it's the most important one, the WD hitch returns the weight to the front axle of the tow vehicle.
Regards,
Steve