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Composting Toilet Update


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#1 Holly&Fred

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 07:30 PM

We are getting ready to purchase a new Casita Indy and wondering if anyone has recent experience with the new composting toilets? Does anyone know if they are an option on a Casita? 

Thanks! Holly & Fred



#2 clairemr1

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 06:37 AM

we just had a lively discussion on the topic, as a matter of fact. "bex-cat herder" is a lady full timing in her 1985 casita Patriot Deluxe and she shows details on "youtube". while there are pros/cons to it, just like everything else, i think it's a definite possibility for those of us who boondock frequently, where water conservation is important. a well maintained and properly used compost toilet, just like a regular toilet, is a very clean alternative, no smells, etc. of course, anyone who misuses/neglects the recommended compost toilet procedures may report something negative about it, but that's not a reflection on the compost toilet. good luck with your decision...................


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#3 Holly&Fred

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 07:35 AM

We recently toured the (nearby) Oliver Trailer  factory in Hohenwald TN, where the nice tourguide informed us, during a 2 hour plant tour,  that more and more folks were ordering THEIR trailers with the "new composters".   Oliver goes ahead and installs the plumbing and blackwater tanks FOR a std toilet, so that an owner CAN easily switch back to the Stinky Slinky type at a later date.   Oliver may have hopped the shark on this installation.  I still wish Casita had this as an option.  


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#4 WandaR

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 08:09 AM

Well, you DO have this option in your Casita- you have the black tank plumbing installed as standard.  Take out the standard WC and pop in a composting toilet.  Buy it from Oliver, and maybe you can get them to install it.


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#5 Carol Christensen

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 11:15 AM

While I like the concept of dry composting toilets, frankly, having some experience in the field of microbiology, my interest is the "safe" disposal of human solid waste.  ("Safe" as in Public Health Safety).  Public Health laws exist because untreated human solid waste contains pathogens and viruses that are dangerous to humans.  Solid waste that is not treated in conventional sewage treatment plants, will need certain conditions and lots of time to break down. 

 

IMO, this informative article covers the subject of RV Composting Toilets very well.  It's rather long but well researched; it includes information on the legal and safe disposal of human waste.  The authors have written articles for Trailer Life Magazine and Motorhome Magazine.

 

Eco-toilets answers this question: How long will it take for the solids to break down into compost?

 

The breakdown of human feces into harmless compost starts to happen within the toilet, especially if the toilet is not in continuous use. The speed with which this happens varies largely dependent on the warmth of the environment. In warm conditions this can be 6 months, whilst in colder conditions it can take as long as a year.  For this reason we encourage storage of composting material in a warm place, or adding it to an existing composter, where other kitchen or garden waste can assist with composting.  For those wanting to break their waste down in the shortest time, we recommend the ‘Aerobin composter‘.  This well designed product encourages high temperatures in the compost and can render human waste as compost in as little as 90 days if well managed.

In order to ensure that all pathogens or other harmful bacteria are neutralized, the Environment Agency advise that such compost material should be kept on site for 26 weeks, but after that time it can be removed to another site or disposed of in domestic refuse or recycling systems.


Edited by Carol Christensen, 08 December 2017 - 01:59 PM.

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Carol Christensen
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pre-Nova was Ova-the-Rainbow 1999 17' LD (sold)



Don't believe everything you think.

#6 bikedawg

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Posted 31 December 2017 - 06:10 PM

We Americans have fallen way behind the rest of the world be it composting toilets or the so called "leadership" program we "elected", may the gawds be merciful upon our souls.

Anyway, the innovators of progressive "camping" down under are leading the way, Rice like the rest of rural Texas is so far behind the idelogical curve that they're no longer on the road.

Innovate or die it is said.


http://www.kimberley...-camper-trailer

Edited by bikedawg, 31 December 2017 - 08:27 PM.


#7 Firetruck41

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Posted 31 December 2017 - 06:59 PM

Way to make toilets political. :rolleyes:

On the actual subject of composting toilets, I am skeptical of it being as useful for my family, as I imagine I would have to be dumping the bin, far sooner than required to accomplish the composting.

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#8 lgboro

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 02:54 PM

I installed a Nature's Head in my 2017 LD prior to leaving for a 5 week trip to Quartzsite and points South.  I have had the opportunity to use my install for 5 weeks or so and it has been very easy to maintain and in my opinion requires no more work that the factory flush toilet.  The only odor I can recognize is the chemicals I put in my black tank where I routed the liquid side of my system.  It only requires emptying the solids bin as needed which is much much less often than the grey tank will fill and require emptying and the usual care and cleaning of the outside of the unit as any other toilet.  As far as the environmental concerns I know the county/city waste system that treats waste where I live has a less than stellar record of strict compliance with accepted and mandated practices.  If you are considering a compost system I would suggest you do your own research as you will get a load of useless opinions from posters that have little or no knowledge of a compost system.  As for me, mine has preformed exactly as described  by Nature's Head as long as it is used in compliance with suggested practices.  I seldom camp where sewer hookups are so it has been a very positive experience for us.  


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#9 Meadowlark

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 03:57 PM

Like Carol, I, too, am a biologist, and the idea of a composting toilet in a camper makes me wary.

 

The important thing to remember, as Carol and Igboro say, is a composting toilet needs to be properly managed in order to work correctly. Note that quote in Carol's post: it takes 90 days IF well managed. In cold conditions it can take up to a year to completely break down the waste. I assume it means that no additions are made to the storage, which probably means the end result is never attained. . It mentions also to store it where kitchen and garden waste is already composting.

To me, quite honestly, it's not worth the risk, or the wait. Composting all by itself is a haphazard, start and stop process that, if the pile is outside, is subject to temperature changes. And note, the Eco-toilet's quote mentions adding your human waste to your kitchen and garden compost pile/bin, etc.

Are you really going to then put the composted human feces, mixed in with kitchen and garden waste, on your garden bed? REALLY?  I don't know if that's legal. I do remember being in various countries where we soldiers were forbidden to eat the local produce because of farmer's using "'night soil''' (human feces) to fertilize their fields. And with good reason.

 

I'm not saying that composting toilets aren't a good idea, I'm saying that unless you really are scrupulous in your management of one, it's not the best idea.


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These are the voyages of the small ship, "Grus Egg".

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#10 lgboro

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Posted 25 March 2018 - 04:40 AM

I don't find the compost at the point of emptying the solid bin offensive (it smells like dirt that earthworms are harvested oil to me) but I certainly wouldn't want to eat it.  However, almost every farmer in eastern NC grinds chicken and turkey poop and spreads it over their fields and I'm sure as common as this practice is we have all eaten food grown in these fields.  I don't thing most foreign countries regulate farmers even to the degree we do here in the states.



#11 clairemr1

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Posted 25 March 2018 - 05:59 AM

along the same lines, i'm sure composting toilets have undergone intense scrutiny by various agencies before being introduced to the public. these toilets aren't current news, they've been in use for years. i certainly find them a much more hygienic alternative to us former tenters, now boondockers than the old practice of digging "cat holes". rain, erosion, animals can dig into those and scatter the raw contents. right where others will be pitching their tents. talk about hygiene issues!

    bottom line, whether casita choses to offer a compost toilet (like the $65,000.00 oliver trailer company is doing) or not, it's pretty easy to remove the existing toilet and install a compost toilet. this decision, like many having to do with our trailers, is more about personal camping/travel style...................


Edited by clairemr1, 25 March 2018 - 06:00 AM.

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