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#31 Meadowlark

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 02:02 PM

Thank you, Plainsman, and if I have offended anyone out there, please...forgive me and accept my apologies. I have no desire to hurt anyone's feelings. I grew up hearing all the nasty terms (and was called them at times) and I don't use them, but that one had never been described to me, and I didn't know it meant anything but 'trash man.".


Edited by Meadowlark, 27 June 2016 - 02:20 PM.

These are the voyages of the small ship, "Grus Egg".

2011 17" Spirit Deluxe, "Grus Egg"

 

"I saw what you did."-Karma


#32 Meadowlark

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 02:19 PM

My horse has never pulled anything but carrots out of my pockets...but I bet he'd look great pulling one of your wagons! And I'm sure you know that horses don't 'pull' anything. They push against the horse collar. 

I do remember learning from my grandmother that cities had sanitation workers called "white wings" whose job it was to push a cart and pick up horse manure from the city streets..Now that job is done by horse mad wackos like me, who pick up horse manure for free. (but we don't dump it in the river.)


These are the voyages of the small ship, "Grus Egg".

2011 17" Spirit Deluxe, "Grus Egg"

 

"I saw what you did."-Karma


#33 clover

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 02:28 PM

 

I had the misfortune of growing up in Detroit, where the only horses were under the hoods of cars...............save one. There was an alley that ran behind my grandmother's house and once a week the 'sheeny'. would come by. ..I am not certain what the term meant, although to my contemporary ear,  it sounds like an ethnic or racist slur. The sheeny drove his horse drawn wagon behind the houses, looking for stuff to (what we call now) recycle. I remember him to be a small swarthy white man and his horse to be a old grey horse. I had an ear for hoofbeats and the minute I heard them I'd be out the door, no matter the weather, running to pet the horse. It drove my parents crazy but...when you're born horse crazy, you do what you have to satisfy the addiction.

 

still horse crazy after all these years...................

A fun fact I share on some of our tours.....back in 1895.....they say there were 25 million horses in our country....today....it is estimated we have a little over 4 million horses.  In 1895......they say there were 250,000 horses on the streets of New York City in any 24 hour period and they use to throw most of the manure into the surrounding rivers.  When they were leaving the horse drawn era and moving to horseless carriages.......they said the new horseless carriages would be the "solution to pollution!"  That was their theory anyways! 

 

Jerrybob

 

Although the number of horses has dropped significantly since the late 1800s, it's a bit higher than the numbers you had, a bit of twice that number 9.4M. Horses have been part of my life from before I could walk and my vocation for 30+ years. Here are some interesting statistics

http://www.horsecouncil.org/economics/

 

I had been involved in the very expensive show horse industry where the wealthiest spent a lot of money and created millions of full time jobs both directly and indirectly in the equine industry. I saw two major down turns when the tax laws were changed in the late 90s and again in 2007 when the wealthiest of the wealthy dialed in back in advance of the crash, they saw it coming. Much criticism has been put on "luxury spending" such as horse, yachts, expensive cars, expensive hunting dogs.....with that luxury spending comes a lot of jobs. In our area of "Horse Country" in North Texas it meant money in the pockets of restaurants, gift shops, florist shops, truck/trailer makers, truck/trailer detailers , saddle/tack makers, hay growers, feed mills, ranch hands, accountants, grocery stores, barn & fence builders, cabinet makers, home builders, etc......much/most of it is gone. 

 

Horses fever should be added to the list of addictions. 


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(I know it is overkill but we live on a real ranch it takes a vacation with the Casita)


#34 Meadowlark

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 02:33 PM

No kidding they saw it in advance, Clover...not only that, I believe they orchestrated it.


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These are the voyages of the small ship, "Grus Egg".

2011 17" Spirit Deluxe, "Grus Egg"

 

"I saw what you did."-Karma


#35 clover

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 03:03 PM

In the late 50s in Cleveland, OH the "rag man" would come up and down the cobble stone streets in my neighborhood with his more than skinny horse and wagon. He would gather any cloth someone was going to throw away and/or trade/sell "new rags"....that seem like an oxymoron. 

 

This is a picture of one in Baltimore, his horse looked better than the one I recall in Cleveland.

 

There are still a fair number of horse events using some sort of horse drawn wagon/buggy/sleigh. Obviously most not out of necessity. When I worked on a large ranch of nearly 900K acres we used draft horses in the winter to pull hay sledges. Chariot Cutter races were big there winter and summer, talk about wild and wooly, it's right up there with chuck wagon races. Chariot Cutter is a bit of a misnomer. A cutter is a sleigh and a chariot has wheels. Apparently in the "old days" locally they raced both types. In "modern times" they run on wheels year round. 

 

Attached Files


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(I know it is overkill but we live on a real ranch it takes a vacation with the Casita)


#36 Jerrybob

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 05:35 PM

 

 

I had the misfortune of growing up in Detroit, where the only horses were under the hoods of cars...............save one. There was an alley that ran behind my grandmother's house and once a week the 'sheeny'. would come by. ..I am not certain what the term meant, although to my contemporary ear,  it sounds like an ethnic or racist slur. The sheeny drove his horse drawn wagon behind the houses, looking for stuff to (what we call now) recycle. I remember him to be a small swarthy white man and his horse to be a old grey horse. I had an ear for hoofbeats and the minute I heard them I'd be out the door, no matter the weather, running to pet the horse. It drove my parents crazy but...when you're born horse crazy, you do what you have to satisfy the addiction.

 

still horse crazy after all these years...................

A fun fact I share on some of our tours.....back in 1895.....they say there were 25 million horses in our country....today....it is estimated we have a little over 4 million horses.  In 1895......they say there were 250,000 horses on the streets of New York City in any 24 hour period and they use to throw most of the manure into the surrounding rivers.  When they were leaving the horse drawn era and moving to horseless carriages.......they said the new horseless carriages would be the "solution to pollution!"  That was their theory anyways! 

 

Jerrybob

 

Although the number of horses has dropped significantly since the late 1800s, it's a bit higher than the numbers you had, a bit of twice that number 9.4M. Horses have been part of my life from before I could walk and my vocation for 30+ years. Here are some interesting statistics

http://www.horsecouncil.org/economics/

 

I had been involved in the very expensive show horse industry where the wealthiest spent a lot of money and created millions of full time jobs both directly and indirectly in the equine industry. I saw two major down turns when the tax laws were changed in the late 90s and again in 2007 when the wealthiest of the wealthy dialed in back in advance of the crash, they saw it coming. Much criticism has been put on "luxury spending" such as horse, yachts, expensive cars, expensive hunting dogs.....with that luxury spending comes a lot of jobs. In our area of "Horse Country" in North Texas it meant money in the pockets of restaurants, gift shops, florist shops, truck/trailer makers, truck/trailer detailers , saddle/tack makers, hay growers, feed mills, ranch hands, accountants, grocery stores, barn & fence builders, cabinet makers, home builders, etc......much/most of it is gone. 

 

Horses fever should be added to the list of addictions. 

 

Thanks Clover for the update......when I did some research a few years back......I read the lower number.  I agree......horses bring significant value to the economy.....plus.....they're beautiful.  



#37 Jerrybob

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 05:45 PM

In the late 50s in Cleveland, OH the "rag man" would come up and down the cobble stone streets in my neighborhood with his more than skinny horse and wagon. He would gather any cloth someone was going to throw away and/or trade/sell "new rags"....that seem like an oxymoron. 

 

This is a picture of one in Baltimore, his horse looked better than the one I recall in Cleveland.

 

There are still a fair number of horse events using some sort of horse drawn wagon/buggy/sleigh. Obviously most not out of necessity. When I worked on a large ranch of nearly 900K acres we used draft horses in the winter to pull hay sledges. Chariot Cutter races were big there winter and summer, talk about wild and wooly, it's right up there with chuck wagon races. Chariot Cutter is a bit of a misnomer. A cutter is a sleigh and a chariot has wheels. Apparently in the "old days" locally they raced both types. In "modern times" they run on wheels year round. 

 

 

Love the pics........thanks for sharing......the old work wagons are some of my favorites.  We have an old mail buggy that was used for mail service in the late 19th century in Oregon......painted on the side.....RFD No.2......that was Rural Free Delivery Route 2.   Just cut a deal on an old oil wagon from Minnesota......will be arriving at the end of July but will be in my shop for several months.  Restored a Portland Cutter  and box sleigh last year....both in the museum.  I love these old vehicles......if only they could talk!



#38 Meadowlark

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 06:18 PM

I saw a very fun competition on the tube a couple weeks ago...a bunch of kids on ponies (and horses) were going flat out,  shooting arrows at targets alongside the list. I've seen Cowboy Shooting, where the folks fire handguns at targets, but this looked like way more fun.


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These are the voyages of the small ship, "Grus Egg".

2011 17" Spirit Deluxe, "Grus Egg"

 

"I saw what you did."-Karma


#39 Plainsman

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Posted 28 June 2016 - 05:27 AM

Years ago I saw a film about competition carriage driving. It featured Prince Philip who has a passion for the sport. It is a dangerous business! The wagons are almost armored they are so beefed up and the terrain they race on can be daunting. Collisions with trees and rocks, fearful crossings of rivers and streams, getting overturned-- all in a day's work for these folks. Here's an article on the prince...

http://www.telegraph...ng-passion.html

And this URL will give you pages of pictures of the sport...

https://www.bing.com...iving&FORM=IGRE

These people don't mess around!
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#40 clover

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Posted 28 June 2016 - 07:00 AM

Plainsman it is called Combined Driving here in the states. Years ago when I was still in practice I had a client that was a very "stiff" IBM executive that spent a lot of money on Morgan Horses. She was very big into this event. The have a course they have to cover in a with in a certain time frame. Some what like car rallies going point to point cross country. Each horse drawn vehicle has to have a "monitor" (navigator/helper). She asked me if I wanted to ride with her. I replied in the positive.

 

The one we were in was apparently typical for those put on in Texas. I was in open country (pastures) selected for rugged terrain, river beds, steep hills. The obstacles are within is a small defined area with a gate you have to enter that was typically hard posts sunk in the ground just wide enough to get the wheel hubs through. That day all of the entrance gates were  railroad ties. You make your time once inside the obstacle moving around difficult objects (bolders, trees, steep creek beds).

 

I had no warning of what to expect. Once this woman got to the gait of the obstacle her head would spin the the language that came out of her reminded me of the movie Rosemary's Baby!!! My job was to stay in buggy, confirm she completed the obstacle, keep track of time and function as a counter weight when she made sharp U-turns on steep embankments or in creek beds.It was definitely Wild & Wooly.

 

Singles, Tandems and Four-in-Hands would compete. It is easy to tear up an expensive vehicle. These horses and drivers are tough. The other parts of the competition is similar to  dressage with a cart/wagon, there is an "appointments" judging as well. Briefly this later part happens after you have dragged the horse and all of the equipment through the mud and rocks. You then have to have it cleaned up as good as those that Jerry restores with "proper vintage" clothing for attire. I've been told some folks have come to the finish with most of the wagon gone and maybe just riding on the front axle.

 

The craftsmanship in building and restoring these old vehicles is an art to be admired. Like a lot of very interesting things to do outdoors they have fewer and fewer people in pursuit of them and opting for video games, cable TV and other electronic entertainment.


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Clover
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(I know it is overkill but we live on a real ranch it takes a vacation with the Casita)


#41 Jerrybob

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Posted 28 June 2016 - 09:03 AM

What a great story Clover.....that must have been quite a ride and a lot of fun!



#42 clover

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Posted 28 June 2016 - 08:19 PM

Yes it was an unexpected  blast! She gave me no warning of what to expect, which made it a much better surprise. I never viewed her through the lenses of an IBM Executive again......it became the lenses of this is what a crazy horse loving Adrenalin Junky :wacko:  :blink:  can look like :wow:  :lol2:


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Happy Trails!
Clover
2003 17' SD
2002 F350 Diesel Crew Cab
(I know it is overkill but we live on a real ranch it takes a vacation with the Casita)


#43 clover

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Posted 29 June 2016 - 07:58 AM

Here is a short video highlights of the Kentucky Cup Combined Driving Event. These drivers/trainers are by far some of the best horseman found anywhere. To handle this much horse power with just the tips of your fingers is amazing, especially if you are considering the team work needed for two or four in hand. These drivers have what "horse folk" call "light hands" this is not out muscling these horses it is "telegraph" communications through their reins.

 

 

This topic fits under "places/events to visit using your Casita as a gateway for the trip". Or "theme trips via my Casita"

 

The Carriage Museum that Jerry supports, Calgary Stampede Chuck Wagon Races, Kentucky Horse park for a variety of awesome horse events.

 

Meadowlark you need to make a trek to Kentucky Horse Park. The museum would keep you busy for at least 3-4 days, then make a trip to Lexington, Keeland and Churchill Downs in Louisville. 


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Happy Trails!
Clover
2003 17' SD
2002 F350 Diesel Crew Cab
(I know it is overkill but we live on a real ranch it takes a vacation with the Casita)


#44 Meadowlark

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Posted 29 June 2016 - 02:26 PM

Thank you, ma'am. I was so very fortunate to be able to attend Horsemen's Disneyworld the World Equestrian Games in 2010. OMG, it was incredible. I went with a bunch of horsecrazy women (my NHH...Non Horsey Husband did not go, nor did anyone else's)  so I was free to enjoy what can only be the best horse event I've ever been to in my life. (despite Al Tech's tsunami of advertising to include that blood airplane doing circles over the arena) I did go through every museum. Since then I have tried repeatedly to get a camping spot for Rolex but holyguacamole, those things are like gold. IF you are lucky to get through on the phone to the Park to reserve a site the day the reservations open, you are still not going to get one. I think someone snaps them up and doles them out to their insider friends.

It is incredible to watch the Driving. Those horses are insane. They LOVE THAT stuff. Let's GO. The first time I saw it I thought, yeah, big deal, so they're driving wagons? Holy cow, HANG ON because it's going to be a wild ride. I admire you for having the courage! How did you manage to not only hang on but also keep track of time and function?


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These are the voyages of the small ship, "Grus Egg".

2011 17" Spirit Deluxe, "Grus Egg"

 

"I saw what you did."-Karma


#45 clover

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Posted 29 June 2016 - 02:45 PM

Meadowlark you went into the equis crazidus overloadus syndrome. I never tried to get into that event at the KHP just for a visit of the grounds, once when I interned out of school at Spendthrift Farms and then again several years ago when we went to Mammoth Cave & the Corvette Museum Kentucky. 

 

No bravery on my part, just didn't know what to expect. Is was like being on a racing sailboat in a 30 knot wind, you had to "hike to the high side" and "act as rail meat". (counter weight in an attempt to keep the boat flat).  She wacked the wheel hubs several times on some of the railroad ties they had as narrow entrances to some of the obstacle areas. It was intentional to have very narrow places they had to pass through and around. I'd love to do it again if the opportunity ever presented itself. However, I don't travel/work in the equine circle anymore.


Happy Trails!
Clover
2003 17' SD
2002 F350 Diesel Crew Cab
(I know it is overkill but we live on a real ranch it takes a vacation with the Casita)