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Trying To Make My Wife Happy


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#16 HBarlow

HBarlow
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  • Local time: 09:35 PM
  • Gender:Couple

Posted 08 May 2014 - 10:44 AM

jimrex, on 08 May 2014 - 10:22 AM, said:

Arlon, I'll check it out.  The initial cost is outside my comfort level, but not having to crawl under car to run wires here and there is appealing.

 

It seems that this unit would rely upon the Casita battery for brake power.  Other units rely upon a wiring kit that provides a dedicated wire straight from the battery.

 

HBarlow, on 07 May 2014 - 06:35 AM, said:

Jimrex,

 

Your Subaru must have a seven wire wiring harness from engine compartment to seven pin connector at the towing hitch.  A factory made professionally cut, routed, terminated, and insulated wiring harness is preferable to seven wires wrapped with electrician's tape made up by a semi-skilled tech.  I don't know if anyone makes such a harness for a Subaru but I recommend you call around starting with etrailer.com to see if you can find and purchase one.

 

The seven wire wiring harness is required to provide not only running, brake, and turn signal lighting but trailer brakes and a 12 volt dc charge line to keep your trailer battery charged while towing and allow you to operate the refrigerator on dc power if desired.

 

The wiring harness should be installed with an isolation relay to protect the tow vehicle's circuits from damage.  Tapping into the Subaru's lighting circuits with direct wiring and flimsy connectors is a recipe for an expensive failure.  When wires are shorted to ground the car's factory wiring harness can be destroyed and car fires can result.

 

A skilled technician who does these installations on a regular basis can usually be found at an RV dealership.  Expect to pay for the wiring harness and an hour or two of shop labor.  Short cuts usually cost a lot more later.

HBarlow,

 

Don't worry - I didn't tap into the wiring for the lights.

 

Subaru installed a 4 pin flat female connector (the only thing that they will install), but my Casita had a 7 pin female blade connector.  So using a 4 pin male pigtail adapter, I inserted the bare wires into the Casita's plug to make sure that the correct light would function, then I terminated the pigtail leads to the screw posts in the 7 blade male connector and secured the strain relief.  Worked great.  This connection was made just to have lights for the trip home.

Thanks for your concern, but I was an instrument and control technician for 16 years before branching out to IT, so I'm familiar with the proper wiring techniques and the use of test equipment.  Plus, having an iPad handy to display the Casita's plug wiring was a great benefit!

 

How did "Subaru" connect the four pin?  Did they run a hot 12 vdc lead from the battery through a relay?  I'll be very surprised if the dealership used an isolation relay.



#17 jimrex

jimrex
  • Topic Starter
  • Casita Club Member
  • 25 posts
  • Local time: 09:35 PM
  • Location:Pearland, TX
  • Gender:Couple

Posted 14 May 2014 - 02:44 AM

You can also try Discount Hitch. They have locations near you.

 

http://www.discounth...s.com/Locations

 

Eileen

Eileen,

 

 I did call DIscount and they didn't want to do the extra wiring involved to add a brake controller to the Outback.



#18 jimrex

jimrex
  • Topic Starter
  • Casita Club Member
  • 25 posts
  • Local time: 09:35 PM
  • Location:Pearland, TX
  • Gender:Couple

Posted 14 May 2014 - 02:46 AM

 

jimrex, on 08 May 2014 - 10:22 AM, said:

Arlon, I'll check it out.  The initial cost is outside my comfort level, but not having to crawl under car to run wires here and there is appealing.

 

It seems that this unit would rely upon the Casita battery for brake power.  Other units rely upon a wiring kit that provides a dedicated wire straight from the battery.

 

HBarlow, on 07 May 2014 - 06:35 AM, said:

Jimrex,

 

Your Subaru must have a seven wire wiring harness from engine compartment to seven pin connector at the towing hitch.  A factory made professionally cut, routed, terminated, and insulated wiring harness is preferable to seven wires wrapped with electrician's tape made up by a semi-skilled tech.  I don't know if anyone makes such a harness for a Subaru but I recommend you call around starting with etrailer.com to see if you can find and purchase one.

 

The seven wire wiring harness is required to provide not only running, brake, and turn signal lighting but trailer brakes and a 12 volt dc charge line to keep your trailer battery charged while towing and allow you to operate the refrigerator on dc power if desired.

 

The wiring harness should be installed with an isolation relay to protect the tow vehicle's circuits from damage.  Tapping into the Subaru's lighting circuits with direct wiring and flimsy connectors is a recipe for an expensive failure.  When wires are shorted to ground the car's factory wiring harness can be destroyed and car fires can result.

 

A skilled technician who does these installations on a regular basis can usually be found at an RV dealership.  Expect to pay for the wiring harness and an hour or two of shop labor.  Short cuts usually cost a lot more later.

HBarlow,

 

Don't worry - I didn't tap into the wiring for the lights.

 

Subaru installed a 4 pin flat female connector (the only thing that they will install), but my Casita had a 7 pin female blade connector.  So using a 4 pin male pigtail adapter, I inserted the bare wires into the Casita's plug to make sure that the correct light would function, then I terminated the pigtail leads to the screw posts in the 7 blade male connector and secured the strain relief.  Worked great.  This connection was made just to have lights for the trip home.

Thanks for your concern, but I was an instrument and control technician for 16 years before branching out to IT, so I'm familiar with the proper wiring techniques and the use of test equipment.  Plus, having an iPad handy to display the Casita's plug wiring was a great benefit!

 

How did "Subaru" connect the four pin?  Did they run a hot 12 vdc lead from the battery through a relay?  I'll be very surprised if the dealership used an isolation relay.

 

HBarlow,

 

You were right!  I called Subaru and they did tap into the light circuits for the 4 pin connector.  So, that's another thing that I can correct with the etrailer.com purchase - an isolation circuit.