Jump to content


Photo

Carrying a Generator in the Back of My Truck


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 frosin

frosin
  • Casita Club Member
  • 671 posts
  • Local time: 08:33 PM

Posted 26 April 2008 - 11:47 AM

I know that someone out there has an answer to this.

We're taking our first trip with the Kipor generator (a Honda 2000 clone). My truck has a hard tonneau cover. I know that it gets pretty hoy under that cover in the Texas sun. My questions can I safely carry the generator with a full tank of gasoline back there? I plan to leave it about a pint low to allow for fuel expansion so that when I open the vent on the fuel cap I don't get a gusher of gasoline in my face. I also plan to fill the generator at gas stations from the gas pump. For static electricity concerns I will lift the generator out of the bed of the truck and set it on the ground for fueling.

Is it safe to carry a can of spare fuel back there too?

Fred
Fred and Mary
'99 17' SD
2005 Toyota Tacoma PreRunner
San Antonio, Texas

"The Road Goes On Forever and the Party Never Ends". Robert Earl Keen

#2 Don in Ut

Don in Ut
  • Casita Club Member
  • 588 posts
  • Local time: 07:33 PM
  • Location:Salt Lake City, UT
  • Casita Model/Size:'96 16' SD
  • Interests:Exploring the beautiful mountains and canyons of Utah and other western states. I also enjoy off roading - snowmobiling in winter.
  • Gender:Male
  • Casita Club Directory #:1710

Posted 26 April 2008 - 12:59 PM

Fred

I, and I suspect most, carry my generator in the back of my truck. And I have had concerns about fume build up and the possibility of a spark putting me in orbit. With a significant build up of fumes in a confined space, one tool striking another and making a spark could really ruin one's camping trip. This is what I have done in order to lessen the possibility.

I no longer carry a separate fuel container but use a bulb / siphon tube to refuel the generator from the truck gasoline tank. I use one from Harbor Freight that is cheap and works fine.

I have a low profile camper shell on my truck and have never been able to smell fumes when I open the back window / door. I think the shell has more ventilation than your tonneau cover. Also, Utah is considerably cooler, even during the hottest months than TX. I don't know if you can leave a crack in your cover for ventilation while in transit or not but that may be an idea.

I will also be interested in more knowledgeable responses from others on the topic.

Don in UT


'96 SD 16' HLA 20 degree down start
'98 Toyota Tacoma 4X4 extended cab

#3 Robert Brummett

Robert Brummett
  • Casita Club Member
  • 791 posts
  • Local time: 08:33 PM
  • Interests:Travel (duh!); bird hunting and bird dogs; flintlock hunting; history; rural life; Irish archeology; lots of other stuff, too.
  • Casita Club Directory #:1240

Posted 26 April 2008 - 01:11 PM

I've carried my Honda in the backs of two different capped trucks, in all kinds of heat (including south Texas in July), and never had a problem. I've also carried spare gas in a jerry can-- admittedly one of the pricier ones-- and had absolutely NO fumes in the back of the truck at any time. Nevertheless, it's certainly something to consider and whatever reasonable precautions one could take would be worthwhile.
"OTRA" (On The Road Again)
2003 17' Spirit Deluxe #1240
2004 2500HD Duramax Diesel Crewcab

The Sandhills of 'East Wyoming'

#4 DesertHawk

DesertHawk
  • Casita Club Member
  • 1,849 posts
  • Local time: 08:33 PM
  • Location:Las Cruces, New Mexico USA
  • Gender:Male

Posted 26 April 2008 - 03:55 PM

unsure.gif I have carried my Honda 2000i in the back of our Ford Ranger under a hard tonneau cover for two & 1/4 years with no problems. I fill the tank full, no gas gushing at all, very little smell, if at all. I also carry a 2 gal plastic gas can under the tonneau. I have in a rubbermaid like box container with a lid that "snaps" on. It will have a gas smell when it is opened, normally it does not make the bed smell at all. I carry 26 gal of water at times under there as well and did not want the gas to smell up the water tank. It has not. The filler opening seems to be made of plastic, I have filled it several times at the pump in the back. We have had them under cover in 100 + heat. The summer of 2006, we traveled in record heat in ND into SD and on into WY. We traveled all day in very hot 100+ tempertures. When we opened up the tonneau to cool the egg down after making camp at The Devil's Towercampground, there was not a smell, nothing gushed out when I opened the vent. My tonneau is white, which keeps the heat out more than a dark color would. I believe some air moves in and out of it as well, from the bed openings, tail gate open places, etc. It is not air tight. The Ranger is small back there, if you have a full sized pick-up, it will be even less likely to build up dangerous fumes.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Devil__s_Tower.jpg

Edited by DesertHawk, 26 April 2008 - 03:56 PM.


AvatarLance_zps7f135dff.jpg

DesertHawk* Las Cruces, New Mexico USA

2015 Lance 1985~Casita de Campo~23' 4" Tongue to Bumper with Dinette Slide

160 watt Solar Panel, GoPower Solar Controller
2009 White Ford F-150 Reg. Cab
Long Bed with A.R.E. Molded Fiberglass Topper
Previously ~ 2005 16' Scamp

#5 frosin

frosin
  • Topic Starter
  • Casita Club Member
  • 671 posts
  • Local time: 08:33 PM

Posted 26 April 2008 - 06:30 PM

I might have found the answer to my own question. Thanks to you guys for providing your input. I appreciate that.

Autoignition temperature
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The autoignition temperature or kindling point of a substance is the lowest temperature at which it will spontaneously ignite in a normal atmosphere without an external source of ignition, such as a flame or spark. This temperature is required to supply the activation energy needed for combustion. The temperature at which a chemical will ignite decreases as the pressure increases or oxygen concentration increases. It is usually applied to a combustible fuel mixture.

Autoignition temperatures of liquid chemicals are typically measured using a 500 mL flask placed in a temperature controlled oven in accordance with the procedure described in ASTM E659 [1]. The commonly accepted autoignition temperature of paper, 451 F (233 C), is well known because of the popular novel Fahrenheit 451 by author Ray Bradbury (although the actual autoignition temperature depends on the type of pulp used in the paper's manufacture, chemical content, paper thickness, and a variety of other characteristics).

Autoignition point of selected substances

* Triethylborane: -20C (-4F)
* Silane: <21C (70F)
* White phosphorus: 34C (93F)
* Carbon disulfide: 100C (212F)
* Diethyl ether: 170C (338F)
* Diesel: 210C (410F)
* Paper: 233C (451F)
* Gasoline (Petrol): 257C (495F)
* Magnesium: 473C (883F)
* Butane: 500C (900F)
* Hydrogen: 571C (1060F)

Now I just need to work on keeping the inside of my truck bed below 495 degrees.

Fred
Fred and Mary
'99 17' SD
2005 Toyota Tacoma PreRunner
San Antonio, Texas

"The Road Goes On Forever and the Party Never Ends". Robert Earl Keen

#6 Tawny&Gary

Tawny&Gary
  • Casita Club Member
  • 336 posts
  • Local time: 06:33 PM
  • Location:Apache Junction, AZ
  • Interests:We love the desert, mountains, Nat'l & State parks and hiking in nature.
  • Gender:Male

Posted 27 April 2008 - 05:09 PM

QUOTE (frosin @ Apr 26 2008, 06:30 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I might have found the answer to my own question. Thanks to you guys for providing your input. I appreciate that.

Autoignition temperature
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The autoignition temperature or kindling point of a substance is the lowest temperature at which it will spontaneously ignite in a normal atmosphere without an external source of ignition, such as a flame or spark. This temperature is required to supply the activation energy needed for combustion. The temperature at which a chemical will ignite decreases as the pressure increases or oxygen concentration increases. It is usually applied to a combustible fuel mixture.

Autoignition temperatures of liquid chemicals are typically measured using a 500 mL flask placed in a temperature controlled oven in accordance with the procedure described in ASTM E659 [1]. The commonly accepted autoignition temperature of paper, 451 F (233 C), is well known because of the popular novel Fahrenheit 451 by author Ray Bradbury (although the actual autoignition temperature depends on the type of pulp used in the paper's manufacture, chemical content, paper thickness, and a variety of other characteristics).

Autoignition point of selected substances

* Triethylborane: -20C (-4F)
* Silane: <21C (70F)
* White phosphorus: 34C (93F)
* Carbon disulfide: 100C (212F)
* Diethyl ether: 170C (338F)
* Diesel: 210C (410F)
* Paper: 233C (451F)
* Gasoline (Petrol): 257C (495F)
* Magnesium: 473C (883F)
* Butane: 500C (900F)
* Hydrogen: 571C (1060F)

Now I just need to work on keeping the inside of my truck bed below 495 degrees.

Fred



Thanks for the research on this subject ...I don't plan on having a generator back there but my cover is black and I had some concerns. But as Desert Hawk mentioned, I have found tha tthere is air circulation that easily gets under the cover and that should really help provide some margin of safety. Your facts take the worry out of my mind. Happy Trails and enjoy the generator!

Gary

Gary & Tawny

Apache Junction, AZ

2008 17' SD ("B2") Formerly

2011 Heartland Prowler 5th wheel Currently


#7 kmfosterk

kmfosterk
  • Casita Club Member
  • 627 posts
  • Local time: 08:33 PM
  • Location:Bozeman Montana
  • Gender:Male
  • Casita Club Directory #:1408

Posted 27 April 2008 - 08:30 PM

I can't speak for the Kipor but the Honda EU2000 gas cap has On and Off vent valve. Mine has never leaked and never smelled gas fumes; this gas cap is designed to hold the pressure created by the gasoline.

On the other hand for those that carry the regular gas cans that you buy at any auto parts store I would not carry those or store them in vehicles for long trips. You are better off getting a Marine style gas can or a Wedco style metal jerrycan. Neither of these will leak and will hold the pressure that builds up. Also; if you were in an accident you will appreciate having a much heavier duty gas can instead of cheap one.

My opinion any way!

Attached Thumbnails

  • Tempo_Marine_Above_Deck_Gas_Tank.jpg
  • Wedco_Jerry_Can.jpg

Kent - #1408
X 17' Casita LD owner

#8 Merrill and Diane

Merrill and Diane
  • Casita Club Member
  • 107 posts
  • Local time: 10:33 PM
  • Location:Saddlebag Lake Resort, Lake Wales, FL
  • Casita Model/Size:Casita LD/17 - 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Casita Club Directory #:999

Posted 28 April 2008 - 04:17 AM

The danger is not that the fuel will self ignite, but is the fuel vapors igniting if there is an ignition source in the area such as a loose electrical connection that is arking. Several aircraft have exploded in flight due to fuel vapors igniting from an electrical sparking source in the immediate area of the fuel vapors.[/font][font="Arial Black"]

#9 Tawny&Gary

Tawny&Gary
  • Casita Club Member
  • 336 posts
  • Local time: 06:33 PM
  • Location:Apache Junction, AZ
  • Interests:We love the desert, mountains, Nat'l & State parks and hiking in nature.
  • Gender:Male

Posted 28 April 2008 - 07:16 AM

QUOTE (Merrill and Diane @ Apr 28 2008, 04:17 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The danger is not that the fuel will self ignite, but is the fuel vapors igniting if there is an ignition source in the area such as a loose electrical connection that is arking. Several aircraft have exploded in flight due to fuel vapors igniting from an electrical sparking source in the immediate area of the fuel vapors.[/font][font="Arial Black"]


Darn ... and just when I thought it was safe to swim again! unsure.gif

Gary & Tawny

Apache Junction, AZ

2008 17' SD ("B2") Formerly

2011 Heartland Prowler 5th wheel Currently


#10 Matt

Matt
  • Casita Club Member
  • 129 posts
  • Local time: 09:33 PM
  • Location:Taft, Texas
  • Interests:I enjoy reading, mostly biographies and history, but also a good novel, and even crime stories.<br />I've been hiking in Big Bend National Park since 1983, and have visited every US state. <br />Foreign travel includes all Western European countries except Belgium. I've also visited the Balkans and several eastern countries. I've been to Vietnam, China, Central America, and much of the Caribbean. <br />I love my Casita and have been from coast to coast and Mexico to Canada in the short time I've owned her. <br />In the past year I've slowed down after being diagnosed with stage III Follicular B cell lymphoma. I'm not officially in remission but am done with CHOPS and am doing Rituxen which is working to hold the beast back.
  • Gender:Male

Posted 07 May 2008 - 12:03 PM

As an ex fireman I am almost paranoid about highway safety. For that reason I may be overstating my case here, but I think it is crazy to carry plastic gas cans regularly in the back of a truck. Haul it in plastic from the gas station home, but to carry any more than is absolutely necessary is as dangerous as carrying live grenades back there. Five gallons.....heck, one gallon of gasoline ingniting in the back of your truck will fully involve your vehicle instantly. Add to that the stuff igniting in an accident where you may be trapped and the scenary gets downright horrifying.
I've seen RVers with five gallon containers of gas tied to the rear of their trailer or RV and cringe at what even a minor rearender could do.
Keep the gas and your generator separate. I was involved in a case where a gasoline powered water pump exhaust was inches from a plastic gas container. The heat melted the container and bingo, they had a very impressive fire fueled by about five gallons of gasoline. If you keep them apart that can't happen.
I plan to keep my Honda EU3000 in the back of my truck when it is running in camp. I have a high top Leer shell and will open the back when the generator is running. I was contemplating a trip to the gas station each time I filled the generator until someone here mentioned th safety of a siphon. Duh, why didn't I think of that. Thanks!
I'm driving to Rice to get my new egg tomorrow; my first RV so I'll be in here asking questions as I have been for a month now.
We are real excited about getting our Casita. Biggest surprise is seeing used ones in here for not much less than we are paying for a new one. That's reassuring.
Thanks again,
Matt
Matt & Virginia Kline

Nueces Bay (Near Taft/Portland, Texas)
2008 17SD
2010 Ford 150 Lariat

#11 Rich & Penny

Rich & Penny
  • Casita Club Member
  • 478 posts
  • Local time: 08:33 PM
  • Location:Salt Lake City, Utah

Posted 07 May 2008 - 02:56 PM

Matt, It's better to set your generator on the ground. The truck bed acts like a megaphone, making the generator even louder than it normally is.

#12 J & M

J & M
  • Casita Club Member
  • 42 posts
  • Local time: 09:33 PM
  • Location:Maine

Posted 09 May 2008 - 04:11 PM

So.... we tow with a SUV and have not as yet mounted the Honda 2000 on the tongue.
Should we carry the generator with gas tank empty (vent open?), and use a siphon?
John & Mary
"Poco Casa"
'05 17' LD
'02 4Runner

#13 Don in OKC

Don in OKC
  • Casita Club Member
  • 4,533 posts
  • Local time: 09:33 PM

Posted 09 May 2008 - 04:37 PM

QUOTE (J & M @ May 9 2008, 07:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
So.... we tow with a SUV and have not as yet mounted the Honda 2000 on the tongue.
Should we carry the generator with gas tank empty (vent open?), and use a siphon?


Don't plan on siphoning. Gas theft guards are installed on most, if not all vehicles. Anyway, try it. We carried the EU2000 in the minivan, gassed up, vent closed. Odor was not a problem.

Don in OKC - (Useta have a) 2000 16' LD, 98 Chrysler T&C

#14 Whit and Selma

Whit and Selma
  • Casita Club Member
  • 120 posts
  • Local time: 07:33 PM

Posted 10 May 2008 - 08:13 AM

We have been traveling with a Honda eu200i for just about a year now. Some of you may cringe at how we carry this, but we're comfortable and haven't found a downside. I can't recommend it for other generators.

We carry our generator in the rear of our Yukon XL. We set it outside and at least 10 feet from the Casita to use it. After running the genset, I let it cool completely then I drain the gas from the carburetor, fill the fuel tank to full, and lock (turn to "Off") the gas fill cap.

I don't put it in a tub, box or anything else that will trap fumes.

I carry our extra fuel in 1 gallon containers kept in milk crates on the roof of the Yukon. That way we very seldom have a partially full container... very dangerous. I make sure the fill caps and vents are open on empty containers.

We have not noticed any gasoline smell inside of the vehicle, even if it has sat for a couple of hours in 90+ heat.

Whit
Whit & Selma
Newport, Oregon

2011 EverLite 27RB
2007 Chev Crewcab 2500HD 6 liter
2004 Seaward Passat g3

#15 Bobinyelm

Bobinyelm
  • Casita Club Member
  • 4,218 posts
  • Local time: 09:33 PM
  • Location:Waxahachie, TX

Posted 10 May 2008 - 11:35 AM

RE: Kipor Generators.

They have a vent lever on the gas cap as well, and I have carried them w/ full-to-empty fuel tanks, and never got a whiff of gas, just as we didn't with the Honda.

Bob